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Leadership Bios

Ben Bloom

Ben Bloom

Founder & CTO ​
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Jonathan King

Jonathan King

Co-Founder & Chief Scientist ​
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Robin Coxe

Robin Coxe

Vice President, Control Systems Engineering
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Sarah Murrow

VP, Human Resources
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Justin Ging

Justin Ging

Chief Product Officer
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 Photos

  • quantum computer
    First Generation Quantum Computer, Phoenix, Berkeley, California August 2021
    Pictured here: Special Blue Lasers that Atom Computing uses to make qubits
  • Phoenix
    First Generation Quantum Computer, Phoenix, Berkeley, California August 2021
  • closeup of phoenix
    First Generation Quantum Computer, Phoenix, Berkeley, California August 2021
    The heart of Phoenix showcasing where the qubits entangle.
  • Phoenix closeup
    First Generation Quantum Computer, Phoenix, Berkeley, California August 2021
    Pictured here: Special red lasers that Atom Computing uses to make qubits.
  • group working on machine
    Employees work on Phoenix, Atom Computing’s 100-qubit prototype system housed in Berkeley, California.  August 2022
  • people inspecting computer
    Inspecting a radiofrequency (RF) output of Atom Computing's custom control system on an oscilloscope. August 2022
  • Inserting card into computer
    Inserting a scalable radiofrequency (RF) arbitrary waveform generator line card into a MicroTCA chassis. August 2022
  • man inspecting technology
    A quantum engineer inspects a vacuum component in the optics lab at Atom Computing’s Boulder, Colorado research and development facility. August 2022
  • person working on machine
    A quantum engineer measures optical power for laser beam at Atom Computing’s Boulder, Colorado research and development facility. August 2022
  • man inspecting machine
    A quantum engineer inspects custom optical module at Atom Computing’s Boulder, Colorado research and development facility. August 2022
quantum computer
First Generation Quantum Computer, Phoenix, Berkeley, California August 2021 Pictured here: Special Blue Lasers that Atom Computing uses to make qubits.
Phoenix
First Generation Quantum Computer, Phoenix, Berkeley, California August 2021
closeup of phoenix
First Generation Quantum Computer, Phoenix, Berkeley, California August 2021 The heart of Phoenix, showcasing where the qubits entangle.
Phoenix closeup
First Generation Quantum Computer, Phoenix, Berkeley, California August 2021 Pictured here: Special red lasers that Atom Computing uses to make qubits.

Frequently Asked

Questions

What is a quantum computer?
Quantum computers harness unique properties of quantum physics – specifically entanglement and superposition – to run calculations. These properties enable quantum computers to address certain types of problems by formulating the computation in a way that allows the most optimal solution, amongst vast numbers of possibilities, to emerge.
Why is there so much excitement about quantum computers?
Quantum computers run calculations differently than conventional computers. Because of that, many believe these machines will solve problems considered intractable, or too complex, for even the most powerful supercomputing technology we use today.
What types of “intractable” problems are quantum computers expected to solve?
There are certain problems considered “killer applications” for quantum computing, including the ability to model complex molecules, which is important for computational chemists working in the pharmaceutical and other industries, and optimization problems around logistics, supply chain and scheduling.
Will quantum computers replace our current computing technology? Will we have quantum laptops, tablets or other personal devices?
We cannot predict what will happen in the decades to come or if or when devices such as quantum laptops will exist. However, we believe quantum computers will complement supercomputers and provide researchers and others with another powerful tool to help solve complex problems. Already, companies and organizations are exploring hybrid approaches in which problems are divided up to have certain portions run on supercomputers and other parts run on quantum computers such that each device tackles the portion that it can solve most efficiently.
Is there more than one quantum computing technology?
Just as there are multiple types of vehicle engines – diesel, electric, hybrid, and gas combustion - there are different approaches to quantum computing hardware. Quantum computing hardware technologies are defined by the type of qubit or quantum bit (neutral atom, trapped ion, superconducting, etc.) they use and how quantum operations are performed on those qubits (analog or digital).
What type of quantum technology is Atom Computing developing?
We are building atomic array quantum computing technologies that use neutral atoms as qubits. This is a newer approach that is gaining traction – and attention - because of its ability to quickly scale to larger numbers of qubits, which will accelerate the path to quantum advantage..

For example, we recently were selected by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop a next-generation system through its Underexplored Systems for Utility-Scale Quantum Computing (US2QC) program. The primary goal of the US2QC program is to determine if an underexplored approach to quantum computing can accelerate the path to utility-scale operation.
Are there other companies developing atomic array quantum technologies?
Yes, although the Atom Computing technology has certain technical differences which aim to provide a higher performance, more robust solution.
How is Atom Computing’s technology different from other companies building atomic array systems?
Some of the key differences center around the types of neutral atoms we use as qubits, the way in which we encode information onto qubits, and our decision to pursue universal logic gates. Further, we have designed our systems to maximize uptime and computational efficiency.
How many quantum computing systems does Atom Computing have?
Our 100-qubit prototype system known as Phoenix is based in our Berkeley, California office, which also acts as our headquarters. We are building second-generation, commercial systems in our Boulder, Colorado research and development facility.
918 Parker St. Suite A-13,

Berkeley CA 94710
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